About Mission: Restore

Since 1993, Mission: Restore volunteer surgeons have collectively performed more than 1,500 complex reconstructive surgeries in more than 20 countries and four continents. In recent years, Mission: Restore has focused on the most cost-effective and impactful way to create long-term, sustainable solutions to the emerging world's healthcare needs. Mission: Restore is currently implementing its medical and surgical training programs in Myanmar (Burma) and is planning programs in Tanzania and Haiti. At Mission: Restore, we estimate that we will have trained more than 100 surgeons and changed the lives of more than 100,000 patients in our first ten years.

Our Challenge

At Mission: Restore, we aim to create a sustainable infrastructure, forge long-term relationships, and effect permanent change.

Global Challenge

Each year nearly 5 million people worldwide die from injuries. This is approximately the number of deaths caused by HIV / AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined. Ninety percent of these injuries occur in developing countries.

Our History

In 1993, Mission: Restore Co-Founder and Chair Dr. Kaveh Alizadeh began his volunteer work in the Afghan refugee camps, which was a life-changing experience for him. Each year since then he has participated in volunteer missions and travelled all over the world, including Central and South America, the Middle East, and Asia. In 2009, Dr. Alizadeh's humanitarian volunteer work earned him the prestigious Ellis Island Medal of Honor.

Prior to Mission: Restore, Dr. Alizadeh acquired considerable experience working with large organizations to deliver only high-volume surgeries on location with limited follow-up. In 2010, he recruited a group of physicians to help found a new kind of non-profit organization that would focus on the most cost-effective and impactful way to create long-term, sustainable solutions for the emerging world's healthcare needs. The result was Mission: Restore, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that trains medical professionals abroad in complex reconstructive surgery in order to create a sustainable infrastructure.

Our Progress

Since 1993, Mission: Restore volunteer surgeons have collectively performed more than 1,500 complex reconstructive surgeries in more than 20 countries and 4 continents. In recent years, Mission: Restore has focused on implementing its medical and surgical training programs in Myanmar (Burma) and is planning programs in Tanzania and Haiti. At Mission: Restore, we estimate that in our first ten years, we will have trained more than 100 surgeons and changed the lives of more than 100,000 patients.

Sources

  • Beveridge M, Howard A. The burden of orthopaedic disease in developing countries. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2004;86:1819Ð1822. [PubMed]
  • Murray CJ, Lopez AD. The global burden of disease: a comprehensive assessment of mortality and disability from diseases, injuries and risk factors in 1990 and projected to 2020 (Global burden of disease and injury series; vol. 1). Boston, MA: Harvard School of Public Health; 1996.
  • Peden M. Global collaboration on road traffic injury prevention. Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2005;12:85Ð91. [PubMed]
  • Peden MM, McGee K, Krug E. Injury: a leading cause of the global burden of disease, 2000. Geneva: WHO; 2002.
  • Ghaffar A, Hyder AA, Bishai D, Morrow RH. Interventions for control of road traffic injuries: review of effectiveness literature. J Pak Med Assoc. 2002;52:69-73. [PubMed]
  • Krug EG, Sharma GK, Lozano R. The global burden of injuries. Am J Public Health. 2000;90:523Ð526. [PMC free article] [PubMed]
  • Mock CN. Injuries in the developing world. West J Med. 2001;175:372Ð374. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

Learn more about our team, our work, or how you can make a difference. Our full story is at our dedicated website, missionrestore.org or contact our office online